GeneralLink to Body ContentLink to Site Map
Select Area of Interest

Choose topic:
FAQs
Epidemiology
Pathology
Diagnosis
Control
Prevention
Herd/Flock Management
Laws & Regulations
True Cases & Stories
Gallery Graphics
Line
Testing Services
General Information
Glossary
History
Biology of Ml. Paratuberculosis
Antimicrobial Therapy
Zoonotic Potential
Test Your Knowledge
Handouts/Brochures
Presentations
Links
Line
Guestbook
Sponsors & Credits
Ask the Expert
Site Map
Search the Site
Home

HISTORY
JOHNE'S INFORMATION CENTER - University of Wisconsin Ñ School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin - School of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin - School of Veterinary Medicine
GALLERY GRAPHICS



Photo of Heinrich Albert Johne


SEARCH IMAGES HEADER





Table Bottom

Heinrich Albert Johne
Line On October 23, 1894, in the Oldenburg region of Germany, a farmer purchased a cow that failed to produce milk or gain weight satisfactorily. A local veterinarian by the name of Herr Frederick Harmes examined the cow and, noting the diarrhea and weight loss, suspected intestinal tuberculosis. The cow tested negative by the tuberculin skin test however. It died the following spring and Dr. Harmes sent its intestines, stomach, and omentum for examination to the Veterinary Pathology Unit in Dresden. There the tissues were examined by Dr. H.A. Johne and Dr. L. Frothingham, a visiting scientist from the Pathology Unit in Boston, Massachusetts. Using an acid-fast stain, abundant acid-fast (red staining) bacteria were seen throughout the inflamed tissues. Although the organisms resembled bacteria that caused tuberculosis, a sample of the infected tissue containing the organisms failed to cause disease when injected into guinea pigs. Johne and Frothingham concluded that the disease observed in the cow was caused by the bacterium that causes tuberculosis in birds (Mycobacterium avium) and, in recognition of the pathological similarity to intestinal tuberculosis (normally caused by the bacterium that causes tuberculosis in cattle, Mycobacterium bovis), proposed the name "pseudotuberculous enteritis" for the disease.

Back



HomeLineBack to Top
Line
Copyright
Line
Contact
Line
Sponsorship
Line
Credits