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JOHNE'S INFORMATION CENTER - University of Wisconsin Ñ School of Veterinary Medicine



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Saturday, September 8, 2018
Risk factors for MAP infection of dairy herds.

Research article: M. Puerto-Parada, et al. Risk factors associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis herd status in Québec dairy herds published in the journal Preventive Veterinary Medicine, April 2018. The lead author is from the Département de sciences cliniques, Faculté de médecine vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec.

This epidemiological study verified what many others have shown about limiting risk for introduction of MAP to herds and spread of MAP infection within herds. This study is among the first of its kind from Québec, Canada and serves to remind readers of some fundamental principles of Johne’s disease control:
  • Buy few cattle. Closed herds have the lowest MAP-infection risk and large herd have the highest MAP-infection risk (because they typically buy more cattle). If required, replacement animals should originate from a herd of similar or better MAP risk status.

  • Rear calves hygienically. Calf practices that reduce the contact of newborn calves with adult animals or their feces are critical to minimizing MAP transmission. Specifically, housing multiple cows in a maternity pen is associated with a higher within-herd MAP infection prevalence.

  • Limit natural nursing. Herds in which more that 10% of calves were allowed to nurse their mother or other cows have a higher likelihood of being MAP-infected.

PubMed abstract